Criminal Justice student in crime center

Criminal Justice (B.S.)

The Criminal Justice program prepares graduates with a comprehensive understanding of crime and justice issues. The program institutes critical thinking, research, and communication skills to allow students to move on to graduate level education or enter the professional workforce in criminal justice or related areas such as psychology, sociology, public policy, and law.

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The Criminal Justice program prepares graduates with a comprehensive understanding of crime and justice issues. The programs institutes critical thinking, research, and communication skills to allow students to move on to graduate level education or enter the professional workforce in criminal justice or related areas such as psychology, sociology, public policy, and law. 

Combining an investigation into the social and psychological factors that give rise to criminal behavior with an examination of the systems designed to deter and correct it, the Criminal Justice program provides students with a complex understanding of the administration of justice. Students study the impact of crime on individuals and communities as well as the ways in which different components of the justice system - police, courts, correctional facilities, and community organizations - interact to prevent it. All Criminal Justice majors take courses in law, criminology, the American court system, policing, and correctional approaches. In addition, they can choose among a variety of elective courses in the field including the study of topics such as race and social justice, terrorism, and victimization. 

To broaden career opportunities, many students majoring in Criminal Justice elect to complete course work leading to a minor in Security Studies. The Security Studies minor can provide students with an interdisciplinary background to understanding domestic and international threats to homeland security and risk management.  

Students also have the option of earning both the Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice and Master of Science in Homeland Security in 5 years. In this program, students will take two graduate-level courses in Homeland Security that count towards the Bachelor's degree, and then immediately upon graduation, complete the 30 credit Master's program within a calendar year. 

Curriculum Requirements - Total Credits Required: 125

 

Freshman - Credits: 32

  • Foreign Language   (Cr: 6) 
  • Literary Perspectives General Education Requirement    (Cr: 3)
  • Quantitative Reasoning General Education Requirement    (Cr: 3)
CJ 100 - Introduction to Criminal Justice (Cr: 3)
CJ 151 - Criminal Law (Cr: 3)
ENG 101 - College Writing Seminar (Cr: 3)
Satisfies Writing Designated Requirement
INT 100 - Internship I (Cr: 2)
LST 100 - Seminar in Academic Inquiry (Cr: 3)
PSY 100 - General Psychology (Cr: 3)
SOC 101 - Introduction to Sociology (Cr: 3)

Sophomore - Credits: 32-33

  • Individual and Society General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • Science and Technology General Education Requirement  (Cr: 3)
  • World Cultures General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3-4)
  • Electives   (Cr: 6)
CJ 200 - Criminology (Cr: 3)
CJ 205 - The American Court System (Cr: 3)
CJ 210 - Police Process (Cr: 3)
CJ 215 - Corrections (Cr: 3)
CJ 230 - Technology Applications in Criminal Justice (Cr: 3)
INT 200 - Internship II (Cr: 2)

Junior - Credits: 31

  • Aesthetic Awareness and Creative Expression General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • Global Issues General Education Requirement   (Cr: 3)
  • Values and Ethical Reasoning General Education Requirement  (Cr: 3)
  • Criminal Justice Electives   (Cr: 9)
  • General Education Elective  (Cr: 3)
  • Elective   (Cr: 3)
CJ 302 - Research Methods (Cr: 3)
Satisfies Writing Designated Requirement
CJ 379 - Semester Internship Strategies (Cr: 1)
PSY 241 - Statistical Methods in the Social Sciences (Cr: 3)

Senior - Credits: 30

  • General Education Electives   (Cr: 9)
    (two must be above the 100 level)
  • Elective  (Cr: 3)
CJ 480 - Semester Internship (Cr: 12)
CJ 489 - Senior Thesis I (Cr: 3)
CJ 490 - Senior Thesis II (Cr: 3)

Criminal Justice Electives

Criminal Justice electives include any course with a CJ designation, and

CHE 230 - Forensic Science (Cr: 3)
CSC 390 - Cyber Threats and Security (Cr: 3)
HMS 427 - The Victimization of Children (Cr: 3)
POL 343 - Constitutional Law (Cr: 3)
POL 430 - Human Rights (Cr: 3)

Internships

Partner with Communities to Make a Difference...

Examples of Recent Criminal Justice Major Internships:

Alcohol, Tobacco, and Firearms
Mass. State Police Arson and Bomb Squad
ChildHelp USA
Lynn District Court
Essex County Juvenile Court
Suffolk County Sheriff 's Department,
Essex District Attorney's Office
National Marine Fisheries Service Law Enforcement
US Postal Inspection Service
Lowell Police Department
Massachusetts Environmental Police,
U.S. Attorney Organized Crime and Narcotics Task Force

Careers

Law Enforcement
Government
Corrections
Law
Juvenile Justice
Drug Enforcement
Court Administration
Customs

Download Criminal Justice career sheet for more options and information.

Learning Outcomes

  1. Demonstrate a comprehensive understanding of the operation and impact of the criminal justice system in the U.S. society.
  2. Examine, from a multidisciplinary perspective, the interaction of the criminal justice system and other social institutions and systems.
  3. Apply learned skills necessary for conducting and analyzing qualitative and quantitative empirical studies.
  4. Integrate theory and practice in a way that is relevant to a student's academic and career interests through a senior thesis experience.
  5. Engage in applied learning through fieldwork and internship experiences.
  6. Be prepared for a range of professional positions as well as graduate study in a variety of fields.
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Dr. Robert Jerin
Dr. Robert Jerin views the field of Criminal Justice as not only imparting an understanding of law and order but also equipping students with the power to help those who suffer because of crime. From early on in his career, Dr. Jerin has been a passionate proponent of victims rights - as an advocate in the courts, as a hotline crisis counselor, as an expert on panels and committees, and as a scholar who presents his research on victims laws and the efficacy of services available to those who have been abused. Most recently, Dr. Jerin helped develop Endicott's Victimology minor and created a course on the victimization of children. He currently volunteers in the Essex County court system as an advocate and resource for victims.  
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